Eþeling

Eþeling (Nīwenglisc: Nationalism) is a political, social, and economic ideology and movement characterized by the promotion of the interests of a particular eþel,[1] especially with the aim of gaining and maintaining the eþeling's sovereignty (self-governance) over its hāmland. Eþeling holds that each eþel should govern itself, free from outside interference (self-determination), that a eþel is a natural and ideal basis for a polity,[2] and that the eþel is the only rightful source of political power (popular sovereignty).[1][3] It further aims to build and maintain a single national identity—based on shared social characteristics such as culture, language, religion, politics, and belief in a shared singular history[4][5] [page needed]—and to promote national unity or solidarity.[1] Eþeling, therefore, seeks to preserve and foster a eþel's traditional culture, and cultural revivals have been associated with nationalist movements.[6] It also encourages pride in national achievements, and is closely linked to patriotism.[7] [page needed] Eþeling is often combined with other ideologies, such as conservatism (national conservatism) or Gemǣnscipes rǣd (socialist nationalism) for example.[2]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Smith, Anthony. Nationalism: Theory, Ideology, History. Polity, 2010. pp. 9, 25–30
  2. 2.0 2.1 Finlayson, Alan. "Chapter 5: Nationalism", in Political Ideologies: An Introduction. Edited by Vincent Geoghegan. Routledge, 2014. pp. 100–02
  3. Yack, Bernard. Nationalism and the Moral Psychology of Community. University of Chicago Press, 2012. p. 142
  4. Triandafyllidou, Anna (1998). National Identity and the Other. 
  5. (1981) The Ethnic Revival in the Modern World. Cambridge University Press. 
  6. Smith, Anthony. Nationalism: Theory, Ideology, History. Polity, 2010. pp. 6–7, 30–31, 37
  7. (2005) Global Matrix: Nationalism, Globalism and State-Terrorism. Pluto Press. ; and (2006) Globalism, Nationalism, Tribalism: Bringing Theory Back In – Volume 2 of Towards a Theory of Abstract Community. Sage Publications.